CWSA: People

The diverse team of researchers at the Centre for Cognitive Work and Safety Analysis (CWSA) specialise in applying key CWSA techniques to a range of projects.

Neelam Naikar

Neelam is the lead scientist at the CWSA. She joined what is now the Defence Science and Technology Group (DST Group) as a Research Scientist in 1996 and was promoted to Senior Research Scientist in 1999. Some of Neelam's major projects at DST have involved the extension of Cognitive Work Analysis to support the acquisition of complex, military systems and the application of AcciMap Analysis and the Critical Decision Method to enhance safety in these systems. Her current research interests include the development of theories and methods for analysing cognitive work in complex sociotechnical systems. Neelam obtained a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychology from the University of New South Wales, Australia, in 1993 and a PhD in Psychology from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, in 1996. She is a scientific editor of Applied Ergonomics and a member of the editorial boards for the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making and the Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments. She is also the author of Work Domain Analysis: Concepts, Guidelines and Cases (Taylor & Francis, 2013).

Ben Elix

Ben joined the Centre for CWSA as a Research Scientist in 2006 as part of the DST graduate recruitment program. He graduated with a Bachelor of Psychology (Honours) from Flinders University of South Australia in 2004. Ben conducted his honours thesis in collaboration with the former Land Operations Division of the DST (Edinburgh) where he investigated the possibility of using electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings as a real world measure of Situation Awareness. Ben's current research interests include the application of Cognitive Work Analysis to team design and human-machine interface design.

Alanna Treadwell

Alanna joined the Centre for CWSA as a Research Scientist in December 2008. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts majoring in Psychology and Sociology in 2007 from Monash University. In 2008, Alanna began her Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology also at Monash. Alanna's fourth year thesis project, completed in 2009, investigated the relationship between phantom limb phenomena and the dreaming state. Alanna’s primary focus in her work at the CWSA is the application of Cognitive Work Analysis to organisational redesign, doctrine and strategy development and future operating concept development.

Ashleigh Brady

Ashleigh joined the CWSA as a Research Scientist in January 2011. She graduated from Swinburne University of Technology in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science majoring in Psychology and Psychophysiology. In 2009, Ashleigh completed Honours in Psychology at Swinburne University of Technology. Her fourth year project investigated the efficacy of using video games as a psychological stressor to induce stress responses, as indicated by physiological, biological, and psychological markers of stress. Ashleigh’s work at the CWSA focuses on the application of Cognitive Work Analysis to organisational redesign, doctrine and strategy development and future operating concept development.

Thomas Caldwell

Thomas joined the CWSA under contract in December 2014. Thomas completed a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in History at the University of Melbourne in 2012 and a Masters by Research in 2015. Thomas’ fourth-year thesis investigated the legal and political dimensions of the public performances of the second-century Roman emperor, Lucius Aurelius Commodus. His MA thesis examined the political career of the first-century statesman, Gaius Licinius Mucianus; and his role in the Roman civil war of 69 AD. Thomas’ current research interests focus on the application of Cognitive Work Analysis to human-machine interface design.

Claire Dâgge

Claire joined under contract in April 2015. Claire graduated from a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy from the University of Melbourne in 2014. She completed her Honours in Philosophy at the University of Melbourne in 2015, with her thesis exploring the philosophy of art and the capacity of neuroscience to explain subjective phenomena of aesthetic experience. Claire's work at the Centre is focused on supporting research into worker adaptation in complex sociotechnical systems.